Six Penguins Have Cataract Surgery In World First

These remarkable images show how six penguins were given cataract surgery in what is believed to be a world first.

It was first noticed that the elderly penguins – from Jurong Bird Park, Singapore – had cataracts when they began to struggle to see things in front of them.

The birds – three King penguins and three Humboldt penguins – had their cloudy lenses replaced with ones custom made in Germany in December.

The operations – performed by a veterinary ophthalmologist with a team from the Mandai Wildlife Group – were deemed a success.

This was despite the penguins’ third eyelids making the procedure more complicated than in humans.

The Mandai Wildlife Reserve said in a statement obtained by Newsflash: “Successful cataract surgery on Jurong Bird Park’s geriatric penguins, three King Penguins and three Humboldt Penguins, has helped them enhance their sight and improve their quality of life.

“The surgeries involved the removal of the cloudy lenses caused by cataracts, a common age-related condition that develops in geriatric animals and hinders their vision.

“The King Penguins also received custom-made intraocular lens implants which involved replacing artificial lens on the eye, a procedure believed to be a first in the world for penguins.”

Picture shows Penguin keeper Hafiz Yani prepares male King Penguin, Zorro, for the journey to The Eye Specialist for Animals clinic, in Singapore undated. Successful cataract surgery on geriatric penguins, three King Penguins and three Humboldt Penguins, has helped them enhance their sight and improve their quality of life. (Mandai Wildlife Group/CEN)

Mandai Wildlife Group veterinarian Dr Ellen Rasidi said: “We noticed the cloudiness in their lens and moving about like they were having difficulty seeing things in front of them.

“Cataract surgeries for animals are increasingly common and effective for restoring vision.

“Together with the animal care team, we opted for this procedure to enhance their overall well-being and welfare, as well as aid in the transition to their new home in Bird Paradise when they move.

“Since the recovery period, we have observed an increase in responsiveness and activity levels in the penguins.

“It is nice to see them more active, indicating their improved vision, and for the King Penguins – adapting well to the new lenses as well.”

Picture shows a King Penguin undergoing cataract surgery at The Eye Specialist for Animals clinic, in Singapore undated. Successful cataract surgery on geriatric penguins, three King Penguins and three Humboldt Penguins, has helped them enhance their sight and improve their quality of life. (M Mandai Wildlife Group/CEN)

The Mandai Wildlife Reserve continued: “Animals that reach 70 per cent of their life span are placed in a Senior Animal Care Plan, which includes more frequent health checks by the veterinary team and specialised diets to ensure they continue to live quality lives even in old age.

“As part of the penguins’ care regime, Mandai Wildlife Group engaged veterinary ophthalmologist Dr Gladys Boo from The Eye Specialist for Animals in August 2022 to check the eyes of its penguin colony where the senior penguins were diagnosed with cataracts.

“Following the diagnosis, the Eye Specialist for Animals team led by Dr. Boo, together with the assistance of the veterinary team from Mandai Wildlife Group, successfully performed cataract surgeries on the penguin patients in December 2022.

“After the surgery, the penguins had to remain out of water and stayed in a separate den from the rest of the colony to recover, as keepers administered eye drops twice daily.”

vPicture shows custom intraocular lenses were made in Germany based on measurements of each individual King Penguins eyes, in Singapore undated. Successful cataract surgery on geriatric penguins, three King Penguins and three Humboldt Penguins, has helped them enhance their sight and improve their quality of life. (Mandai Wildlife Group/CEN)

Dr Gladys Boo, veterinary ophthalmologist from The Eye Specialist for Animals, said: “The success of these surgeries marks a milestone in veterinary medicine.

“While intraocular lens implants are common for humans and some domestic mammals, it is likely the first-time they have been successfully used on penguins.

“As a larger species, the King Penguins have eyes large and stable enough to hold the custom lenses in place, so we decided to pursue this world-first procedure to further improve their vision above removing the cataract.

“The lenses were custom-made in Germany to fit each penguin’s eye based on precise measurements taken in advance and took about two months to make.

“Cataract surgeries on their own are already delicate procedures, but for penguins, it was made trickier by unique characteristics such as a third eyelid which protects their eyes underwater.

“The third eyelid tends to close during the surgery which can make it difficult for us to access the eye.

Picture shows Holly, the Humboldt Penguin, post-surgery, in Singapore undated. Successful cataract surgery on geriatric penguins, three King Penguins and three Humboldt Penguins, has helped them enhance their sight and improve their quality of life. (Mandai Wildlife Group/CEN)

“I’m glad we were able to work through these challenges to improve the lives of these animals.”

The statement said: “The penguins made a full recovery two months after the surgery, and they are currently back with the rest of the colony in Jurong Bird Park before they move.”


To find out more about the author, editor or agency that supplied this story – please click below.
Story By: William McGeeSub-EditorMarija Stojkoska, Agency: Central European News

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