Study Shows Chimpanzees Have Different Stone Tools Depending On What Nut They Want To Crack

Read more about the article Study Shows Chimpanzees Have Different Stone Tools Depending On What Nut They Want To Crack
Image shows a female chimpanzee cracking Panda oleosa nuts using a granodiorite hammerstone on a wooden (panda tree root) anvil, undated photo. (Liran Samuni, Tai Chimpanzee Project/Newsflash)

A new study has revealed that chimpanzees use a variety of different stone tools depending on what kind of nut they want to crack. The research was led by archaeologists…

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Different Strategies Needed To Protect Different Bee types Finds UK Study

Read more about the article Different Strategies Needed To Protect Different Bee types Finds UK Study
Great yellow bumblebee (Bombus distinguendus) on Centaurea nigra. (Pieter Haringsma/Newsflash)

A study using 10 years of citizen science data from the Bumblebee Conservation Trust’s BeeWalk scheme has found that a variety of targeted conservation approaches are needed to protect UK…

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UNESCO World Heritage Site Revealed As One Of Oldest Neanderthal Archaeological Locations

Read more about the article UNESCO World Heritage Site Revealed As One Of Oldest Neanderthal Archaeological Locations
Picture shows Equus molar teeth found at the Galeria de las Estatuas site, in Atapuerca, Spain, undated. The the dating of fossil teeth shows it could be one of the oldest Neanderthal sites in Spain. (CENIEH/Newsflash)

An archaeological site listed as a UNESCO World Heritage could be one of the oldest Neanderthal excavation sites in Spain with a new study saying it could date back 115,000…

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Only Humans And Tuskers Use Their Nose And Mouth To Create Sound

Read more about the article Only Humans And Tuskers Use Their Nose And Mouth To Create  Sound
Image shows scientists Veronika Beeck (right) and Michael Kerscher (left) in Nepal in an undated photo. (Veronika Beeck/Newsflash)

Humans and elephants are the only mammals to combine their mouths and their noses to create sounds, a new study has revealed. Cognitive biologists Veronika Beeck and Angela Stoger-Horwath and…

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All Teeth Come From Single Ancient Sea Predator, According To New Study

Read more about the article All Teeth Come From Single Ancient Sea Predator, According To New Study
Teeth originated in an armored ray that swam the oceans 100 million years ago, according to new research, carried out by a scientific team at Penn State University in the U.S. Undated photo. (SWNS/Newsflash)

Teeth originated in an armoured ray that swam the oceans 100 million years ago, according to new research. They evolved from jagged spikes along the snout of the primitive sea…

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Stony Corals Use Fan System To Save Themselves From Climate Change

Read more about the article Stony Corals Use Fan System To Save Themselves From Climate Change
Image shows a coral in an undated photo. Scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute in the German city of Bremerhaven discovered that corals can protect themselves from harmful oxygen concentrations by influencing the flow conditions on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2022. (Julian Gutt, Alfred-Wegener-Institut/Newsflash)

Corals have developed a sophisticated internal fan system to protect themselves from climate change, a new study has revealed. Coral reefs are under threat from coral bleaching which eventually leads…

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Swiss Glaciers Lose Half Their Volume In 85 Years, Study Shows

Read more about the article Swiss Glaciers Lose Half Their Volume In 85 Years, Study Shows
The Marjelenalp glacier in Switzerland, pictured in 2021. Scientists reconstructed the retreat of glaciers using historical photo material and came to the conclusion that the volume of the glaciers halved between 1931 and 2016, in Switzerland. (VAW, ETH Zurich/Newsflash)

Switzerland’s glaciers have decreased by around 50 per cent within 85 years - and are now melting at an even faster rate. Experts studied tens of thousands of period photographs…

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Scientists Succeed In Reversing Alzheimer’s In Mice

Read more about the article Scientists Succeed In Reversing Alzheimer’s In Mice
Developer Eran Lumbroso holds a mouse during a demonstration at The 2nd International Conference of Israel Homeland Security expo on November 12, 2012 in Tel Aviv, Israel. (Uriel Sinai/Getty)

Alzheimer's has been reversed in mice after scientists boosted the formation of new brain cells. A gene therapy fueled neurons in the hippocampus - a region vital for learning and…

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Extinct Predator Gulped 8-Metre Prey As A Whole, 3D Model Study Reveals

Read more about the article Extinct Predator Gulped 8-Metre Prey As A Whole, 3D Model Study Reveals
An illustration of megadolon eating their pray, undated. Scientist theorize the megadolon might require over 98,000 kilo calories every day and have stomach volume of almost 10,000 liters. ( J. J. Giraldo/Newsflash)

Research of a 3D reconstruction of the largest shark that has ever lived reveals that it was capable of devouring prey up to eight metres long in one piece. The…

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Modern Human Brains Less Error-Prone Than Neanderthals, Says Study

Read more about the article Modern Human Brains Less Error-Prone Than Neanderthals, Says Study
Visualization of fewer chromosome segregation errors in modern human in contrast to Neanderthal neural stem cells in an undated photo. German researchers discovered differences in the development of Neanderthal and modern human brains, as of Friday, July 29, 2022. (Felipe Mora-Bermudez, MPI-CBG/Newsflash)

Modern human brains make fewer mistakes than those of Neanderthals despite being of similar size, scientists in Germany have found. Researchers from the German Max Planck Institute have discovered that…

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