Read more about the article Climate Heat Crisis Makes Ants More Aggressive, Says Study
Image shows ant species Tetramorium alpestre that live in high alpine areas, undated photo. Researchers from the University of Innsbruck, in Tyrol, Austria, found out that climate crisis makes the ants more aggressive. (Petra Thurner, Forschungsgruppe Molekulare Oekologie/Newsflash)

Climate Heat Crisis Makes Ants More Aggressive, Says Study

Austrian boffins claimed in a recent study that ongoing climate change make ants act more aggressively. The study - published by a research team from the University of Innsbruck in…

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Read more about the article Amputated Sea Spiders Can Regrow Their Rear Ends, Says Study
Image shows two sea spider (Pycnogonum litorale) individuals next to their prey - a sea anemone, undated photo. When researchers from the University of Vienna, Austria, illuminated them with a UV light source, the spiders fluoresce bright blue. (Georg Brenneis/Newsflash)

Amputated Sea Spiders Can Regrow Their Rear Ends, Says Study

Amputated sea spiders can regrow large parts of their bodies including their rear ends and reproductive organs, a new study has shown. Biologists discovered that the species of sea spiders…

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Read more about the article Ancient Greeks Married First Cousins To Protect Their Estates
Image shows Bronze Age family harvesting grain, undated photo. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, got new insights into Bronze Age marriage rules and family structures in Greece. (Nikola Nevenov/Newsflash)

Ancient Greeks Married First Cousins To Protect Their Estates

Ancient Greeks kept their estates and farmlands together by arranging for first cousins to marry each other, a new study has revealed. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary…

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Read more about the article Lettuces Absorb Toxins Released From Tyre Wear, Says Study
Image shows the actual experimental setup in which the researchers added tyre abrasion to the nutrient solutions of lettuce plants, undated photo. Austrian researchers from the University of Vienna found out that lettuce takes up toxic additives from tyre wear. (Gabriel Sigmund/Newsflash)

Lettuces Absorb Toxins Released From Tyre Wear, Says Study

A new scientific study has shown that highly toxic chemicals from tyre wear get absorbed by lettuces through sewage sludge and waste water. Researchers at the Centre for Microbiology and…

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Read more about the article Humans Have Been Using Bear Skins For At Least 300,000 Years, Says Study
Image shows a metatarsal of a cave bear with cut marks, undated photo. Humans have been using bear skins to protect themselves from cold weather for at least 300,000 years according to scientists from the University of Tuebingen, in Germany. (Volker Minkus/Newsflash)

Humans Have Been Using Bear Skins For At Least 300,000 Years, Says Study

Researchers have found out that humans have been using bear skins to protect themselves from cold weather conditions for at least 300,000 years. The archaeological team from the University of…

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Read more about the article Bee Venom Study Hints Breast Cancer Treatment Prospect
The venom of wild bees such as the violet carpenter bee (Xylocopa violacea), with its main component melittin, is less aggressive than that of honey bees, a team from the LOEWE Center TBG discovered, undated photo. In the future, it could be used against breast cancer cells, among other things. (Bjrn M. von Reumont/Newsflash)

Bee Venom Study Hints Breast Cancer Treatment Prospect

The venomous substance produced by one of the most common wild bee species could help to treat breast cancer, according to scientists in Germany. Researchers at Goethe University and the…

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Read more about the article How Sharp Hearing Helped Stop Baby Dinos Being Crushed By Parents
Image shows adult Europasaurus individuals watch over the newly hatched Europasaurus offspring, undated photo. Scientists from Germany and Austria discovered that the species could hear extremely well by analysing its inner ear in December 2022. (Davide Bonadonna/Newsflash)

How Sharp Hearing Helped Stop Baby Dinos Being Crushed By Parents

Dinosaurs had an advanced ability to hear which gave their just-hatched offspring a chance to avoid being squashed by their parents, a new study has revealed. The study by German…

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Read more about the article Honey Can Lower Stroke Risk, Study Shows
Picture shows Tauseef Khan, undated. He is a research associate at Toronto University's Temerty Faculty of Medicine and one of the co-authors of the study entitled "Effect of honey on cardiometabolic risk factors: a systematic review and meta-analysis." (Nema McGlynn/Newsflash)

Honey Can Lower Stroke Risk, Study Shows

Tucking into raw honey can significantly reduce the risk of suffering some of the most common current health issues, scientists in Canada have found. Researchers at Toronto University carried out…

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Read more about the article Secrets Of Ancient Trade Routes Revealed
Image shows gold from the town of Poliochne, in Lemnos, Greece, undated photo. A total of 26 gold objects from the area were studied by the international team of researchers. (Ch. Schwall, OAI, OAW/Newsflash)

Secrets Of Ancient Trade Routes Revealed

Scientists are redrawing lines of ancient trade routes after discovering that 4,500-year-old gold in treasures found in both Troy and modern-day Iraq were mined in the same place. A new…

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Read more about the article New Study Says Other Planets In Solar System Can Affect Earth’s Climate
Image shows the University of Vienna, Austria, undated photo. Researchers discovered that celestial bodies of the solar system changed the Earth's climate about 200 million years ago. (Universitat Wien, Gebhard Sengmuller/Newsflash)

New Study Says Other Planets In Solar System Can Affect Earth’s Climate

The other planets in our solar system have the ability to influence climate change on earth according to a new study conducted by Austrian, British and American scientists. The research…

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