Genetic Study Provides New Insights Into Anglo-Saxon Migrations From Continental Europe To England

Read more about the article Genetic Study Provides New Insights Into Anglo-Saxon Migrations From Continental Europe To England
Image shows grave goods from inhumation grave 3532 at Issendorf cemetery, undated photo. (Landesmuseum Hannover/Newsflash)

A study led by UK and German scientists has revealed that Anglo-Saxons were only 24 per cent English. Early-medieval mass migrations influenced the formation of British society by increasing its…

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Study Shows Chimpanzees Have Different Stone Tools Depending On What Nut They Want To Crack

Read more about the article Study Shows Chimpanzees Have Different Stone Tools Depending On What Nut They Want To Crack
Image shows a female chimpanzee cracking Panda oleosa nuts using a granodiorite hammerstone on a wooden (panda tree root) anvil, undated photo. (Liran Samuni, Tai Chimpanzee Project/Newsflash)

A new study has revealed that chimpanzees use a variety of different stone tools depending on what kind of nut they want to crack. The research was led by archaeologists…

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How Ancient Humans Evolved To Meditate To Deal With Stress

Read more about the article How Ancient Humans Evolved To Meditate To Deal With Stress
Body and mind, picture used to illustrate the fact that the researchers find out that neanderthals could medidate. (Emiliano Bruner-CENIEH/Newsflash)

Scientists have discovered that humans – unlike our Neanderthal cousins – evolved the ability to meditate to deal with past and future stresses. Humans and Neanderthals both shared an important…

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Britain’s Earliest People Lived On Canterbury Outskirts Up To 620,000 Years Ago, New Study Says

Read more about the article Britain’s Earliest People Lived On Canterbury Outskirts Up To 620,000 Years Ago, New Study Says
Artist reconstruction of Homo heidelbergensis making a flint hand axe. (Department of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, Illustration by Gabriel Ugueto/Newsflash)

Some of Britain's earliest humans lived on the outskirts of Canterbury in Kent between 560,000 and 620,000 years ago, a groundbreaking new study has revealed. The study, which was led…

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Scientists Create World’s Largest Chimp DNA Genome From Poop

Read more about the article Scientists Create World’s Largest Chimp DNA Genome From Poop
Given the almost complete absence of chimpanzee fossils, the genetic information from current populations is crucial for describing their evolutionary history, according to German and Spanish scientists. (Pixabay/Newsflash)

An international team of experts has compiled the world's largest wild chimp genomic catalogue by sequencing DNA found in hundreds of samples of ape poo. The team was led by…

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Chunk Of DNA Inherited From Neanderthals Makes Humans More Likely To Get COVID But Less Likely To Get HIV

Read more about the article Chunk Of DNA Inherited From Neanderthals Makes Humans More Likely To Get COVID But Less Likely To Get HIV
DNA analytics in the lab. (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology/Newsflash)

A piece of DNA that many humans have inherited from the Neanderthals makes it more likely to get a serious bout of COVID-19 but 27 percent less likely to get…

Continue ReadingChunk Of DNA Inherited From Neanderthals Makes Humans More Likely To Get COVID But Less Likely To Get HIV