Genetic Study Provides New Insights Into Anglo-Saxon Migrations From Continental Europe To England

Read more about the article Genetic Study Provides New Insights Into Anglo-Saxon Migrations From Continental Europe To England
Image shows grave goods from inhumation grave 3532 at Issendorf cemetery, undated photo. (Landesmuseum Hannover/Newsflash)

A study led by UK and German scientists has revealed that Anglo-Saxons were only 24 per cent English. Early-medieval mass migrations influenced the formation of British society by increasing its…

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Search For Suspect Who Painted Menhir Stone Like Those Made By Obelix White

Read more about the article Search For Suspect Who Painted Menhir Stone Like Those Made By Obelix White
The menhir of La Lancha after it was painted white, in Arcos, Spai, undated. Picture shows the 5,000-year-old megalithic landmark was whitewashing. (entornoajerez.com/Newsflash)

A search is underway for a suspect who whitewashed history by painting a 5.000 year-old-menhir completely white. Menhir's started appearing in the middle Bronze Age and are most commonly found…

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Prehistoric Bronze Age Daggers Were Not Used As Weapons, Research Finds

Read more about the article Prehistoric Bronze Age Daggers Were Not Used As Weapons, Research Finds
Prehistoric Bronze Age daggers weren't used as weapons but mainly as tools for skinning animal carcasses, reveals new research.The knives, made from copper alloy, were widespread in Europe including Britain and Ireland, appearing around 5,000 years ago. See SWNS story SWNNdaggers. As most of these daggers have been recovered as burial goods in warrior graves it was thought they had a ceremonial purpose to show the status of the deceased. But Newcastle University scientists developed a new technique to study organic material on the blades. They discovered lots of traces of bone and sinew of animals and when they made reproductions of them found that skinning animals was their best use. Archaeologists have long debated what these objects were used for, with some saying they were primarily ceremonial objects used in prehistoric funerals and others suggested that they may have been used as weapons or tools for crafts.

Prehistoric Bronze Age daggers were mainly used as tools for skinning animal carcasses rather than as weapons, reveals new research. The knives, made from copper alloy, were widespread in Europe…

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Scientists Create Material That Can Scrub Polluted Air Clean

Read more about the article Scientists Create Material That Can Scrub Polluted Air Clean
Professor Michael Zaworotko, Bernal Chair of Crystal Engineering and Science Foundation of Ireland Research Professor at University of Limerick’s Bernal Institute. (True Media/Sean Curtin/Newsflash)

New sponge-like material has been invented by scientists in Ireland that can absorb toxic benzene from polluted air. Benzene is classified as a carcinogen which increases the risk of cancer…

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Researchers Show The Smaller The Scorpion, The Deadlier Its Sting

Read more about the article Researchers Show The Smaller The Scorpion, The Deadlier Its Sting
Androctonus mauretanicus in Morocco. (Dr Michel Dugon/Newsflash)

Researchers have shown that Indiana Jones was right all along - the smaller the scorpion, the deadlier its sting. Researchers from the National University of Ireland (NUI), Galway have shown…

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